Rejoice – Business Meals Are Still Deductible

//Rejoice – Business Meals Are Still Deductible

Rejoice – Business Meals Are Still Deductible

Article Highlights:

 

  • Ban on Deducting Entertainment Expenses
  • Business Meals
  • Mixed Entertainment and Meals
  • Substantiation Requirements
  • Disallowed Employee Business Expenses

If you are a business owner who is accustomed to treating clients to sporting events, golf getaways, concerts and the like, you were no doubt saddened by the part of the tax reform that passed last December that did away with the business-related deductions for entertainment, amusement or recreation expenses, beginning in 2018. You can still entertain your clients; you just can’t deduct the costs of doing so as a business expense.

While the ban on deducting business entertainment was quite clear in the revised law, a lingering question among tax experts has been whether the tax reform’s definition of entertainment also applied to business meals, such as when you take a customer or business contact to lunch. Some were saying yes, and others no. Either way, both sides recommended keeping the required receipts and documentation until the issue was clarified.

The IRS recently issued some very business-friendly guidance, pending the release of more detailed regulations. In a notice, the IRS has announced that taxpayers generally may continue to deduct 50 percent of the food and beverage expenses associated with operating their trade or business, including business meals, provided:

  1. The expense is an ordinary and necessary expense paid or incurred during the taxable year in carrying out any trade or business;
  2. The expense is not lavish or extravagant under the circumstances;
  3. The taxpayer, or an employee of the taxpayer, is present at the furnishing of the food or beverages;
  4. The food and beverages are provided to a current or potential business customer, client, consultant or similar business contact; and
  5. Food and beverages provided during or at an entertainment activity are purchased separately from the entertainment, or the cost of the food and beverages is stated separately from the cost of the entertainment on one or more bills, invoices or receipts.

The IRS notice also included the following interesting examples related to #5: The taxpayer invites a business contact to a baseball game. The tickets to the game are entertainment and not deductible. However, the taxpayer also purchased hot dogs and a beverage for himself and the business contact. Because the food and drinks were purchased separately, they are not disallowed as entertainment and are deductible if they otherwise qualify as an ordinary and necessary business expense. Had the ticket price included the hot dogs and beverages, they would be treated as non-deductible entertainment. If the ticket price separately stated the ticket price and the food and beverage price, then the food and beverage portion would not be disallowed as entertainment.

Of course, the substantiation requirements still apply. You must be able to establish the amount spent, the time and place, the business purpose and the business relationship and names of the individuals involved. You should keep a diary, an account book, digital files or similar records with this information and record the details within a short time of incurring the expenses. If the meal expense is $75 or more, documentary proof (receipts, etc.) is also required.

If you are an employee, starting in tax year 2018, you will not be able to deduct your unreimbursed employee business expenses, including the cost of client meals. These expenses have been deductible as miscellaneous itemized deductions when you itemized deductions and when your total deductions in that category exceeded 2% of your adjusted gross income. Under the tax reform, this category of deductions is not deductible for years 2018 through 2025. So, unfortunately, the IRS’s expansive definition of meal expenses will not benefit you.

If you have questions related to business meals, substantiation or the ban on entertainment expenses, please give this office a call.

 

By |2018-10-18T15:45:27+00:00October 25th, 2018|Categories: Uncategorized|0 Comments